amenities: Monuments

River Wey Walk

River Wey Walk

Distance 6 miles (9.66 km)          Duration 3 hrs             Calories 900 (est.) An enchanting woodland, National Trust mill, a waterway with a commercial past, a Second World War defence system, ancient spring, 14th-century chapel and historic pubs make the River Wey walk perfect for lovers of history and the countryside. If you are looking for a walk that combines wonderful views with a tranquil riverside stroll and distinctive historical points of interest then this is for you. To get the walk: Install the Handheld Tours app (free) – iTunes App Store or Google Play Store. Select tour using list or map view Click download button Enjoy an excellent day out! The ‘River Wey and Godalming Navigations’ offers an insight into the industries that existed in the area during the last 400 years. This waterway was an important commercial transport route, connecting to the River Thames. Today, it offers a lovely setting for many leisure activities, such as walking, running, cycling, canoeing and boating. On occasion, you can also see barges being hauled along by a horse as they would have been in days gone by. Starting at the free car park for St Martha’s Hill, this 6 mile tour takes you through Chantry Wood, down to Shalford, along the River Wey to Guildford and then returns using the North Downs Way. There are three pubs marked on the route where you can stop off for refreshments. There is also parking at Shepherd’s Way in Guildford if that is a more convenient starting point. The estimated calorie count for this tour is 900 kcal. The tour uses pavements/roads and well-marked pathways, and there are some...
Nettlebed Tour – Coming Soon

Nettlebed Tour – Coming Soon

Distance 5.89 miles (9.47km)      Duration 3hrs    Calories 1,000 Its possible that we should have named this walk the Warburg Nature Reserve walk, as thats where the walk starts and ends but we chose the prickly named Nettlebed a village along the route for the walk instead, various theories exist for the villages name ranging from Roman soldiers who were thought to rub nettles, which grow in abundance in the area (though we didn’t come across them), on their legs to keep warm on marches, to the 18th century when the thread nettles yield was used to make linen cloth.   Of greater interest today is the Nettlebed Kiln a relic of the villages long association with the brick making industry which stretchs back to the Middle Ages and its 14th century pub (now a bistro) the White Hart exudes an outer charm consistent with its age and a good place to stop for either a tea or ale. If you’re interested in a more traditional pub atmosphere then the 16th century 5 Horseshoes in Maidensgrove with its two beer gardens and amazing views of the valley below retains much of what you come to expect in a rural pub. The walk starts in the beautiful Warburg Nature Reserve offering a visitor centre, bird hides, picnic area, parking and toilets though no café facilities.  The nature reserve is home to an incredible range of habitats sheltering thousands of species, and each season there is something interesting to experience. There are roadworks in the area requiring changes to access the parking.  For those using Sat Nav please use the post code...
Cholesbury Hill Fort Tour – Coming Soon

Cholesbury Hill Fort Tour – Coming Soon

Distance 6.38 miles (10.2km)                      Duration 2.49 hrs             Calories 850 (est.) The quiet 13th century rural village of Cholesbury, nestled in the Chiltern Hills is home to an intriguing Iron Age hillfort known as Cholesbury Camp close to the centre of the village. The hillfort is thought to have been constructed between 300 and 100BC primarily for trading rather than military purposes.  Today no evidence remains of building structures no doubt due to is desertion, probably as part of an organised migration following the Roman conquest of Britain.  The defensive fortifications however remain to a good height and are truly impressive when you consider the tools available to the builders who constructed them. Though quiet now, Cholesbury’s history hasn’t always been one of tranquillity, during the English Civil War Parliamentarian troops were billeted here taking part in skirmishes involving Prince Rupert in nearby Chesham and Wendover. The walk takes you across inviting woodlands and fields in this beautiful part of the Chilterns, now under threat from HS2, around the ramparts of the hillfort and through the grounds of the 12th century church dedicated to St Laurence.  The area is rich in wildlife, including fox, badger, and muntjac deer; birds including pheasant, woodpecker, and barn owl; butterflies include marbled white, orange tip, and meadow brown.  The beechwoods, bluebells and orchids all add to the great diversity of life to be found in the area. Parking is in the village public car park next to the cricket ground from which you can see the Full Moon Pub in the adjacent village of Hawridge.  The area follows the national trend of country pub...